If you already have an account with us, please use the login panel below to access your account.


Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Super Moderator David Tong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    14,325
    Post Thanks / Like

    Shedding Light on Flash



    Supplement to the Get a Flash First and Learning Pop-Up Flash posts.

    The little, bright light tube that comes with a camera since the advent of automatic exposure has been one of the greatest mysteries for camera owners. Most know (or think they know) that the little flash unit is provided to provide light when the sun goes down.
    While it used to be that simple during the days when intelligent metering was absent, today's camera and flash allow users to have much more control on how the flash works with the camera as an individual unit. You'll be surprised on how simple the concept really is, and I hope I can demystify the simple flash and improve your day-to-day photography. Note that I won't be covering the topic in detail as mastering flash photography is an art by itself. There are so many things you can do with a flash unit that you're limited only by your creativity. In addition, we're not covering issues like flash settings if you're using a manual flash unit or choose to control the flash without automated metering (i.e. ETTL, PTTL, etc.) I'll provide you with a simple primer that will shed light (pardon the pun) on the whole subject matter, especially if you're a beginner. You only have to remember three things as soon as your flash is turned on (either when you pop-up your on-cam flash or attach your hot shoe flash).
    1. YOUR SUBJECT IS EXPOSED WITH THE FLASH
    2. YOUR AMBIENT/BACKGROUND IS EXPOSED WITH YOUR CAMERA
    3. THE FARTHER YOUR SUBJECT IS FROM THE BACKGROUND WALL, THE SOFTER THE SHADOW OUTLINE
    What you need to do before we start: 1) Set your camera to Manual mode. 2) Set your flash to Auto ETTL mode (for external flash units) and make sure the flash exposure compensation is set to "off" or "0", if you don't have an idea what I'm referring to, read the user's manual. I'll show you a set of photos and they'll be very self-explanatory.


    Read the whole article in http://reviews.davidleetong.com

  2. #2
    DPP Member John Jolbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Cavite / Dubai U.A.E
    Posts
    1,326
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    thanks for this link david, very informative sites.

    TFS! Cheers! John...
    E0S


  3. #3
    DPP Member jasonjavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,157
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    Very very informative. Thanks David

  4. #4
    Super Moderator David Tong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    14,325
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    I'll up the 2nd part within the day (hopefully), discussing indoor, low-light use

  5. #5
    DPP Member Winthrop Banez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    270
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    Hi David:

    Good article. Just wanted to ask .... when I use Manual on my camera (Canon 40D) and set the aperture to around f/5.6 to f/8 and my shutter speed to 1/60 to 1/125, the flash (Speedlite 580 EXII) only fires on the first shot when I use continuous shooting (on the second shot, the flash does not fire). However, in P, Av and Tv modes the flash follows the shots fired (even if continuous). What seems to be my problem and what do I need to do to rectify this?

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards,

    Troy

  6. #6
    Super Moderator David Tong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    14,325
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    Winthrop (cool name btw) - Here's what you need to know http://www.flickr.com/groups/40d/dis...7607107318889/

  7. #7
    Super Moderator David Tong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    14,325
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    Continued from my previous article, Shedding Light on Flash - Part 1.


    I discussed about using flash to lift up shadows in high contrast scenes and how to the camera's exposure and the flash's exposure are separate in my previous post. Now we'll provide some short examples on how to control flash and camera exposure indoors, in close quarters.


    We've all experienced taking flash photos that made our subject look like a shocked deer in front of an approaching car at night. It's not flattering, it looks amateurish, it robs the environment of its atmosphere. The problem increases for dark-haired subjects as the hair will just blend with the dark background with no separation.



    Remember how the camera controls the ambient, and the flash controls the subject's exposure. Always keep that in mind.

    Read the rest of Shedding Light on Flash - Part II on my site

  8. #8
    DPP Member Winthrop Banez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    270
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash

    Quote Originally Posted by David Tong View Post
    Winthrop (cool name btw) - Here's what you need to know http://www.flickr.com/groups/40d/dis...7607107318889/
    Thanks David. Just call me troy

    ha ha ha

  9. #9
    Super Moderator David Tong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    14,325
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Shedding Light on Flash



    Flash - Shedding Light on Flash - Part 3 Now available!

    Iím just adding some practical, daytime and indoor examples with the same (human) subject for this topic. If you havenít done so, please read Part 1 and Part 2 of this article before continuing.


    First of all, Iíd like to thank Nick for replacing my stuffed horse as a subject during our lunch break.


    Here are a set of photos shot indoors. The camera was set to program mode and the pop-up flash was left at 0-flash compensation. Letís play around with the cameraís exposure first - remember that this affects the ambient light.

    read the rest here

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Pentax Flash Light
    By willy_palacios in forum Pentax
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-13-2009, 09:59 AM
  2. Film for flash or studio light?
    By Roger Pantuca in forum Film / Alternative Process / Medium and Large Format
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-20-2008, 11:49 PM
  3. Studio Flash Metering
    By carlosaavedra in forum Lighting
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 12-24-2007, 04:47 AM
  4. Canon Speedlight 580ex
    By troybenedicto in forum Photography Beginners' Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-23-2007, 01:51 PM
  5. Printing and Color Management in the Digital Age
    By Louie Aguinaldo in forum Digital Printing and Color Management
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 09-13-2006, 08:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •