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  1. #331
    DPP Member Marlo Moya's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?



    Dropping by so say how y'all doin? Hihihi... alive and kickin' i should say.
    DPP rules!

  2. #332
    DPP Member tolitsayala's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    read all the post from post #1. this should become a book.

  3. #333
    DPP Member marbinsantos's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    Nice List for us beginners

  4. #334
    DPP Member Ronaldo Amos, Jr.'s Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey_Chua View Post
    Actually, photographers and clients can be found on a wide spectrum, meaning, not only two ends - the high and low. So even a hardworking and prepared newbie (or noob) can find his place in the low (but not lowest) to medium price range, depending again on his skills, not only in his craft but also in his selling and negotiating. Many times, he could have earned more if he knew how to look for the right clients, and if he knew how to price and negotiate.

    If a photographer, noob or not, knew his cost of doing business (CODB), he would know his breakeven point, and would know when he would be losing if he accepted a job at lower than his CODB. He should learn to walk away from such offers, because those are losing propositions.

    The first step towards profitability is knowing one's CODB. Make a complete list of your costs and compare that with what you are being offered. If the price that your client is offering does not give you any profit margin, or worse, lower than your breakeven point, then why do the job?

    The straight path to a losing business is overlooking expenses. Many noobs don't even consider paying themselves for the time that they are spending on the project.
    Thanks for this very nice words of wisdom sir, I hope it's ok if I note this one. Sounds logical and practical.

    A question for pros though:

    The thread was started around 2008... has much changed in the professional scene in the last 4 years, in terms of demand, supply, competition, and pricing?
    Last edited by Ronaldo Amos, Jr.; 03-01-2012 at 03:04 PM.
    "The only verdict is vengeance, a vendetta, held as a votive not in vain, for the veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous" - V

  5. #335
    DPP Member Kaizan C. Caleon's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    Read through the entire night on this post. Darn the business side of photography is fierce. And the whole low-balling thing, is this still prevalent even today? if so, i feel sorta "bad" for entering a local photo competition recently where the facilitators get the copyright to all winning and non winning images, and for all those photos they will only award like 15k for the first price with 5 k decrease up to 3rd place. kinda cheap for hundreds of stock images, and a way to cut cost on professional productions.

    And here i thought that the whole problem in the nursing community at around the same time this thread was started (the whole "unlimited volunteer"; walang kakilala walang item sa ospital; you volunteer, you pay the hospital for the 'experience') brouhaha was bad.. it seems that while big producers and consumers, understandably want to get good services for a more affordable cost; there are some photographers out there who instead of standing by their quality, lower themselves then take a bite at the neck of other photographers, whether they are aware of it or not.

    it seems to me that throughout the thread, too, there are some people who simply don't know their own niche, the place in the market where they belong. I mean, personally, and i am not in the industry bussiness yet (not enough skill for what i would like myself to be priced with), i dont think people with a full frame body, L lenses, nanocoated, or Zeiss optics would or should be expected to price their services as someone with a begginner DSLR model with a kit lens. but in the same light, as one of the earlier posts did mention, there are some photographers who overcharge simply because their clients are gullible so they pull this clients' legs, creating a bad precedent for top-end photographers "since this top end photographer who says he is classs a charges class s money, for class b work; then most photographers who say they are class a are ripping you off, and you can get comparatively similar, if not better work for a significantly lower amount". it's a fallacy i know, but this is what customers think when there are photographers who over charge given the quality of their output. Then at the other end, there are photographers out there who under-value themselves, and do "cheap photography" to get clients, but when you look at their output, its like they are selling gold for the price of bronze, and the consumers get to thinking "photographer says he is class b, charges class c for class a output; therefore you can get class a output from "class b" photographers and the price on the market for quality photographic services is indeed going down". again, another fallacy, but that would be how people think.


    also, pricing is location dependent, you cant expect to be a photographer in the province and charge the same as urban based photographers, your target in your location would not be able to afford you. but then again if you are a photographer with the best and latest gear and with the skill and experience, i doubt it if you would allow yourself to be the giant fish in a very small pond that can't even feed you.


    also, your target customers determine your price. if for example your target are the high society and rich people, obviously you have to have the best gear, a great protfollio that showcases your skill set and expertise, and the price to mach it based on the computations shown here previously (COBD; time, equipment coverage, other expenses factored in, helpers etc.). but the high society bussiness model won't work for middle class, lower-middle class, or poor people obviously, they can't pay for the kind of Quality that people of a higher income braket can pay for.

    as an analogy to this, let's talk about leather shoes. Not everyone can afford a Cole Haan dress shoes (i know, i can't). so there are "cheaper brands". go one level lower and you have brands like hush puppies (i bought one, lasted me half a decade and is still using it), good quality at a comparatively cheaper price. still not all can afford it. There are brands like rusty lopez, after that. Love these shoes during my student days, maybe more expensive than the next tier down the cost line, brands like mario d'borro, but at least i dont need to worry about the shoes breaking on me every six months (might as well mean that i should've taken better care of my shoes back then, but you get the point). And i have heard it time and again in photographyc gear talk, especially with regards to lenses "you get what you pay for". So why can't photographers have the same stand in the services they render?


    many people might as well look at this, my post, and say "big words for a Sony amateur who shoots sub standard blurry images". but from what i have read here and what i have learned so far from everywhere, everything starts with honestly knowing your value and valuing yourself. There is a market for your services, more so if the quality you give justifies your asking price. know your worth; select your target accordingly, a level one swordsman can't hope to bring down the level 99 boss monster; choose a battlefield that plays to your advantages; study the battle scenario; plan then strike. That is the only real way to success.

    just my 2 pixels.
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    Where's the sense in owning a DSLR if you're simply going to POINT AND SHOOT anyway??

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  6. #336
    Moderator Harvey_Chua's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronaldo Amos, Jr. View Post
    Thanks for this very nice words of wisdom sir, I hope it's ok if I note this one. Sounds logical and practical.

    A question for pros though:

    The thread was started around 2008... has much changed in the professional scene in the last 4 years, in terms of demand, supply, competition, and pricing?
    Yes, much as changed - some for the better, some for the worse. There are more photographers breaking into the profession. Competition is fierce. While many are competing to reach bottom pricing, putting them in a downward spiral, there are those who hold their ground. There will always be better opportunities for success for those, whether oldies or newbies, who work hard to improve their craft, make the right investments in equipment and facilities, deliver on their promises, establish relationships based on mutual respect- in other words, live up to the standards of professionalism.

    Thankfully, a local college has offered an AB Photography course, as well as a Diploma Course in Photography that include subjects on the business of photography. Those who are considering becoming professional photographers may want to enroll. If not, there are many resources on the Internet, notably Photoshelter, that teach the business side of photography.

    So, good luck to all of us, and lets not "kill" each other - there's room at the top!
    Adphoto Advertising and Corporate Photography. Production Management - props, locations, talents. Stock Photos. Studio Rentals. Related Photo Services.

    For free tips on the business of photography:
    www.adphoto.com.ph/business

  7. #337
    DPP Member jctreyes's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    Wow. This is really informative. Read through everything in a couple of days and I must say, it changed my way of thinking when it comes to my rate as a photographer. I'm not saying I'm very good but I just realized that my first photography gig only earned me a mere 500 pesos and it made me feel so cheated. Especially after reading this. I was just a backup photographer during that time but we were only paid like 2.5k pesos.

    I've only been into photography for almost 2 years and got into it for the love of the art but I didn't think my work was only good for that little.

    I'll take everything that I read here and consider it when giving out my rates for events.
    My Flickr Page | My Photo Blog

    It's not always about the camera. It's about talent.

  8. #338
    DPP Member benjiemanalo's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    sometimes if you are the right person at the right time...then you can be a photographer more than 6k and up...yesterday I got a client and had a meeting with their family about me covering their wedding and prenups..they ask me how much and I just tell them 17k..they just say "OK"..
    your eyes CAPTURE what the others failed to see..

  9. #339
    Moderator Harvey_Chua's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?

    If there is no resistance to your price, try to raise it and see if it would still be accepted right away. Keep doing raising until you feel resistance to your price - then, for the moment, that is your optimum price level. Of course, you would have to match your services and products to your price.

    The other way is to offer different packages on different price levels. Have your Basic, Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium packages and you might be surprised to find some customers signing up for your most expensive package. Some would, if they can afford it, because what is important to them is what you are promising - the best works possible. If you offered packages at different price levels, you can catch all kinds of clients, not just the low budget ones.
    Adphoto Advertising and Corporate Photography. Production Management - props, locations, talents. Stock Photos. Studio Rentals. Related Photo Services.

    For free tips on the business of photography:
    www.adphoto.com.ph/business

  10. #340
    DPP Member albertcudal's Avatar
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    Re: Are You a Photographer Worth Six Thousand Pesos?



    I was very engrossed reading this thread and finished it in 2 hours..

    Too bad Mr Marlo Moya stopped posting..

    Since I'm already confident with my skill(after barely 2 years of practice), I am now trying to find freelance work.

    Studied my CODB last week and I came up with these:

    Mobilization Cost - Cost from moving yourself from one place to another, food, business meetings with clients.

    Equipment Cost - Your Capital Investment in Photography. As a new player, I currently charge 8.5% for the total equipment cost that will be used in the shoot. The rationale behind the 8.5% is to have an ROI of 1 year for each equipment.

    Photographer's Fee - The fee for your time, talent, and skill. Currently setting this at PhP 5000. I'm not ready to price myself at a higher price since I don't have professional experience. But I do understand and can perform significant skills and technicalities of photography.

    Editing Fee - Fee for operating a high end computer, licensed software, electricity, or outsourcing a graphic artist.

    Printing Fee - Fee for printing costs, including capital for printer.

    Studio Fee - Fee for using my studio. Make shift though.

    Is this good enough???

    My biggest problem though is my portfolio. Some friends were asking if I do prenups, and I said yes I can do prenups but definitely not wedding. However, I don't have anything on my portfolio that involves prenups. All I have are landscapes, and solo portraits but technically and artistically, I strongly believe I can do prenups.

    Hope anyone can shed some light on my predicament.
    Last edited by albertcudal; 01-26-2013 at 12:43 AM.

 

 

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